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SIMPLE INDIGESTION


COLLECTION: GOAT HANDBOOK
ORIGIN: United States
DATE INCLUDED: June 1992

Extension Goat Handbook

This material was contributed from collections at the National Agricultural Library. However, users should direct all inquires about the contents to authors or originating agencies.

DOCN 000000065
NO G-11
SIMPLE INDIGESTION
J. L. Ayers; Los Olivos, CA
S. B. Guss; Pennsylvania State U., University Park
Health and Disease Management


1 Simple indigestion is a frequent problem in goats. It is usually brought about by a change of feed or overfeeding or any factor that brings about a minor change of environment of the rumen. Common causes are: kids getting out of their pens or pasture and finding access to new highly palatable feed, sudden access to a lot of palatable feed after prolonged hunger, eating spoiled or frozen feed, sudden introduction of feed containing large amounts of urea, or placenta eating.

2 Clinical Signs Discomfort manifested by restlessness or quietly lying down, pathetic, weak crying and moderate depression are usual signs. The temperatures and hematocrit are normal and the mucous membranes are pink. In those conditions associated with overeating, the rumen is full, firm and doughy and has no significant contractions. The feces are usually of normal consistency but decreased volume. Recovery occurs in 24-48 hours.

3 Diagnosis Diagnosis is suggested by a history of a change in the nature or amount of diet, the elimination of other more severe possibilities, and the signs. The most important aspect of the diagnosis is to accurately determine that something worse, especially grain overload, has not occurred. As long as the color of the mucous membranes remains a healthy pink and the hematocrit has not increased above 45, the continued diagnosis of simple indigestion is justified.

4 Prevention and Treatment Avoid sudden changes in amount and type of diet without a period of gradually increasing the amount. Accidental exposure can only be avoided by having good pens so that the goats cannot escape to ''greener pastures''. Placentas should be removed as soon as it is passed by the parturient doe.

5 Once the dietary indiscretion has occurred, remove all sources of feed and allow access to water only if grain overload can be absolutely eliminated as a possible diagnosis. The animal will probably regain health without treatment but if desired, a tablespoon of milk of magnesia, 2 ounces of mineral oil and one crushed aspirin in a pint of warm water can be given by drench or by stomach tube to a small kid. Two to four pints of the above mixture can be given to bigger animals depending on their size.

SIMPLE INDIGESTION
COLLECTION;GOAT HANDBOOK
ORIGIN;United States
DATE_INCLUDED;June 1992


 
 


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